Renee Prunier


Posted by Renee Prunier on 12/24/2018

If you've lived in your home for more than a couple years, chances are you've grown rather attached to it. Whether you're selling your house because your family has outgrown it or your company has transferred you to another location, you're probably attaching a lot of sentimental value to the price tag. Unfortunately, sentimental value does not translate into dollars and cents in today's real estate market.

The emotions of prospective buyers will often play a role in their decision to make on offer on your house, but they're probably not going to pay more than the market value for your property -- unless there's a bidding war situation going on. One of the best ways to determine a fair and reasonable asking price for your home is to have it appraised by an experienced real estate agent. Their appraisal will be based on objective data, such as the selling price of comparable homes in your area. The location and condition of your home will have a bearing on pricing your home effectively, as will the prevailing market conditions and other factors. Although online estimates can sometimes give you a ballpark figure of what your house may be worth, a local appraisal is more accurate

A common misconception among homeowners is that a $10,000 home improvement expenditure should justify a $10,000 increase in the selling price of a home. Although that concept may seem logical, it unfortunately doesn't work that way in the real estate market. An updated kitchen, bathroom, or roof may make your house more appealing to prospective buyers and help it sell faster, but it probably won't have a dollar-for-dollar impact on the price buyers would be willing to pay. Since each selling situation is unique, however, your local real estate agent is the best person to consult regarding a fair asking price for your home.

Avoiding Home Seller Mistakes

In addition to overpricing their home, another mistake home sellers make involves three related activities: decorating, staging, and attempting to create curb appeal. In spite of a homeowner's best intentions, their decorating and home staging ideas may clash with those of the house-buying public. When you attempt to tackle home staging on your own, several things could go wrong.

  • You could either spend too much or too little on making repairs and sprucing up your home's appearance.
  • You could spend your time and money upgrading inconsequential features of your home, while overlooking the real important changes that need to be made.
In either case, you're missing the mark when it comes to maximizing the marketability of your home. That's why it pays to take advantage of the knowledge, expertise, and objectivity of a professional real estate agent. Their recommendations on pricing and home staging will be based on experience, best practices, objective criteria, and current market conditions.





Posted by Renee Prunier on 4/9/2018

If you've lived in your house for more than five years, there's a good chance that clutter and disorganization is gradually taking over your basement.

While you probably had the best of intentions when you first moved in, that valuable storage space may now have deteriorated into a hodgepodge of scattered furniture, holiday supplies, old toys, boxes, and miscellaneous junk.

If you're considering selling your house in the near future, straightening your basement will soon become a high priority item. Not only is an organized basement an important aspect of staging a home, but it's a key step in preparing to pack your belongings and move to your next location.

As you'll discover when you start sorting through your old belongings, there will also be opportunities to make money, save money, and help other people.

  • Finding old treasures: One result of tackling a basement organization project is that you'll find usable, lost, and valuable things you forgot you even had. Whether something is valuable or pure junk, stored belongings have a way of getting buried and hidden away for years in basements. Once you start grouping things together and throwing away stuff nobody needs, it won't take long before a semblance of order begins taking shape! The longer it's been since you've organized your basement, the more satisfying it will feel to get it underway and done!
  • Money-making options: A well-organized garage sale can be a profitable way to get rid of things you no longer use or want. If you haven't taken the time to pull out belongings that are buried, hidden, or boxed up, then it's difficult to find what's available to sell. When your stuff is already organized and ready to be carried outside, preparing for a garage sale is generally easier, faster, and more efficient. If you just have a few items you want to sell and don't want to be bothered with a garage sale, there's also the alternative of publicizing it on social media, classified ads, flyers, or word of mouth.
  • Donating to worthy causes: If you happen to have furniture, clothing, toys, electronics, working appliances, or kitchen supplies you no longer need, there's also the option of donating it to charitable organizations, such as the Salvation Army, homeless shelters, or other community service groups. If you keep good records or get a detailed receipt from the charity, there may be the chance to deduct the donation on your tax returns. The best source of information on tax-related matters, of course, would be your accountant.

Whether you're planning on moving soon or staying put for a while, taking a few hours to straighten out your basement will not only be personally satisfying, but you could make some money on the side or help underprivileged families in your community.